Summer Reading for the ARTS!

Here is a list of some of my favorite “art” reading books, take a break from doing art and read under a tree! Mrs. C’s reading list for adults!        Learn about the fascinating arts or enjoy a great fiction read in the arts area Adult/family Technique Books    “Teach Your Child to Draw”  By Mia Johnson  This is a great book to use with your whole family. It has easy to follow    drawing  projects to do with items around the house. Each chapter focuses on a different skill or concept in drawing. It has good illustrations and photos for…

Rembrandt, famous artist once commented,”Practice what you know, and it will help to make clear what you do not know”

Working with pen and ink can be quite freeing as the values are simplified by the ink.   The lack of erasing mistakes creates a natural flow and the artist learns to work with the lines he has put down whether good or “bad”.   Phrasing Rembrandt’s quote in sketching terms:  putting down the visual lines you see in ink makes what you do not “know” or “see” more apparent.  Note in the sketch above how few lines are needed to create the woman.   This is a great way to develop your artists’ eye by trying to use a few lines…

Andy Goldsworthy, enviromental sculptor stated “The essence of drawing is the line exploring space.”

Andy Goldsworthy is an enviromental/nature sculptor creates sculptures that are often fleeting.  His sculptures really embodies the exploration of art and line in nature.  He has amazing vision.  I recommend his books and videos of his work.  The ones that show him working are especially great.  Be inspired by him to look more closely around you for drawing or nature inspiration (even if you are not an artist!). When drawing or sketching outside look for those lines or paths created in nature visually.  They are there, just look closely. Make it a goal when looking for drawing inspiration to find…

Cezanne once wrote, “The sunlight here is so intense that it seems to me that objects are silhouetted not only on black and white but also in blue, red, brown, and violet.”

    As the weather gets better many artists’ head outside to paint and draw.   The Impressionists are typically thought of as the first painters to paint outside.  However famous painter Turner who predates the Impressionists did paint outside.  He even had a boat outfitted so he could paint from the boat in plein air style.   Two different things helped the Impressionists’ on their quest to paint the natural fleeting light of nature.  One was the the concept of contrast in complementary colors developed in the 19th century by the chemist Michel-Eugene Chevreul.  The other was the development of new…

Degas once said, “No art is less spontaneous than mine.”

                I recently went to the Degas exhibit at the Denver Art Museum and was struck by the wonderful combination of showing his sketches and sketchbooks with his oil paintings and pastel works.   It really gives the viewer the experience of discovering what goes into the making of a masterpiece.  Many of his large works have a loose use of brushstrokes and hints of his black “sketched” lines that he used to lay out his compositions with.  The effect it creates is one of art done with some spontaneity and life to it. …

Monet once said “For me,a landscape does not exist in its own right, since its appearance changes at every moment”

Monet’s most interesting and fascinating paintings are his series of paintings of specific places done at different times of day.  It really shows how important light and shadow are in drawings and paintings.  Next time your are in a gallery or museum pay close attention to the light in the art work.  Try to guess what time of day it is!  Seeing is believing!  Monet’s full quote on this subject is enlightening.  Monet said,  “For me, a landscape does not exist in its own right, since its appearance changes at every moment; but the surrounding atmosphere brings it to life…

Rodin once said, “There is no recipe for improving nature. The only thing is to see.”

Recently I was discussing with an enthusiastic group of adults drawing students about really learning to look.   I help them improve their drawings by pointing out subtle details in their reference pictures. I also help with techniques to use to create that look.  One student commented on how amazing things look when you really “see” them.  That is one of the amazing things of learning to draw or paint, it changes how you perceive the world around you !  As the famous sculptor Rodin said once “There is no recipe for improving nature.  The only thing is to see.” Rodin…